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Eggs and poultry B15

Research projects related to the programme

This project assessed the feasibility of using available immuno- and nucleic acid-based detection methodologies including lateral flow devices, an immuno biosensor, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay and real time Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays on farm, for the detection of Campylobacter.
Results available
This project gathered and reviewed existing data on interventions to reduce Campylobacter contamination in poultry slaughterhouses. The information gained from this was used to carry out preliminary and full scale trials. It also provided data that would be required for submission to request approval for their use within the EU.
Results available
This project gathered and reviewed existing data, including unpublished work, on interventions that could be used in future poultry processing, to reduce levels of Campylobacter.
Results available
This project analysed the data generated by industry on Campylobacter colonisation of poultry batches originating from farms with enhanced biosecurity and control farms with standard biosecurity. The study supports the activities of the FSA aimed at reducing levels of Campylobacter spp. colonisation in poultry at farm level in the UK.
Results available
This survey measures Campylobacter contamination on chicken collected at point-of-retail sale.
Results available
The project provides further insights on how Campylobacter grows and survives in meat and how it can be destroyed by appropriate heat treatment including sous vide which uses lower cooking temperatures. A predictive model and user guide has been developed to help the food industry to address this hazard in food production.
Results available
Reviews of the B15 egg and poultry research programmes were held in 2004.
Results available
A rapid test, suitable for on-farm use, for the detection of Campylobacter can provide a tool for farmers to monitor and identify best practice. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was to develop and trial a dipstick-like test strip onto which a few drops of sample could be spotted for quick, easy, inexpensive and on-site detection of Campylobacter in chicken faeces.
Results available