Radioactivity in Food and the Environment RIFE

Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) is the most comprehensive annual independent report of radioactivity in food covering the whole of the UK.
The report combines our monitoring results with those of the Environment Agency, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency. The survey measures radioactivity from different parts of the food chain, including for people who live close to nuclear sites and eat locally produced food. The report also assesses how much radioactivity people would absorb from authorised radioactive discharges in the environment, for example the air.

Research projects related to the programme

The annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report 2017 shows that the level of man-made radioactivity to which people in the UK are exposed remained below the EU legal limit.
This report covers sampling and analysis carried out in 2017 as part of the radiological monitoring programme.
The annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report 2016 shows that the level of man-made radioactivity to which people in the UK are exposed remained below the EU legal limit.
This report covers sampling and analysis carried out in 2016 as part of the radiological monitoring programme.
Results available
The FSA has published the 12th annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report, which shows that the level of man-made radioactivity to which people in the UK are exposed, remained below the EU legal limit during 2013. No food safety concerns were identified.
The report combines FSA’s monitoring results with those of the Environment Agency, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.
Results available
The FSA has published the 13th annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report, which shows that the level of man-made radioactivity to which people in the UK were exposed, during 2014 remained below the EU legal limit. No food safety concerns were identified.
The report combines FSA’s monitoring results with those of the Environment Agency, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and Food Standards Scotland.
Results available
We have published the annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report, which shows that the level of man-made radioactivity to which people in the UK are exposed, remained below the EU legal limit during 2015. No food safety risks were identified.
Key findings The key findings of the report were:
Results available
RIFE 14 is the seventh joint annual report combining the results of the radiological monitoring programmes of the Food Standards Agency (FSA), the Environment Agency, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and the Environment and Heritage Services of Northern Ireland. The RIFE 14 report includes data for samples collected in 2008.
The main purposes of the FSA's monitoring programme are to ensure that discharges of radioactivity do not result in unacceptable doses to people through their diet and to check that levels of radioactivity in food are low.
Results available
RIFE 15 is the eighth joint annual report combining the results of the radiological monitoring programmes of the Food Standards Agency (FSA), the Environment Agency, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and the Environment and Heritage Services of Northern Ireland. The RIFE 15 report includes data for samples collected in 2009.
The main purposes of the FSA's monitoring programme are to ensure that discharges of radioactivity do not result in unacceptable doses to people through their diet and to check that levels of radioactivity in food are low.
Results available
RIFE 2010 is the ninth joint annual report combining the results of the radiological monitoring programmes of the Food Standards Agency, the Environment Agency, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency . The RIFE report includes data for samples collected in 2010.
The main purposes of the Agency's monitoring programme are to ensure that discharges of radioactivity do not result in unacceptable doses to people through their diet, and to check that levels of radioactivity in food are low.