Meat Hygiene Research Programme M01

Research projects related to the programme

This project provided evidence to allow the FSA to better determine what controls should be placed on meat prior to mincing.
Results available
This project involved the collection of fox carcasses and other wildlife species from around the UK for Trichinella testing.
Results available
The results of this study provide a robust measure of the acceptability, among UK consumers, of potential raw meat decontamination treatments. It measured the impact that different levels of information about the treatment would have on consumers' acceptability and labelling preferences, should treated meat go on sale.
Results available
This desk study has identified the options for delivering a safe and hygienic production of smoked skin on sheep meat and delivered a number of recommendations on areas that merit further research.
Results available
This research project aims to improve cleaning of poultry transport crates in order to reduce microbiological contamination.
Results available
This research project aimed to determine the infectivity of different types of cattle tissue by assessing whether BSE can be transmitted to cattle by injecting them with the tissues.
Results available
The research aimed to optimise surface-Fluorescence Intensity Distribution Analysis (surface-FIDA) in respect to sensitivity and specificity of detecting single PrP;-particles. Body fluids such as blood were used to investigate the application of surface-FIDA to living animals. Brain tissue and CSF from preclinical animals were also used to investigate the very early state of disease.
This research project aimed to develop a hygienic and safe procedure for producing 'skin-on' sheep meat.
Results available
The production of partially-eviscerated (effilé) poultry is little known in the UK. However, it is important to consider the risks associated with the production of effilé poultry. This project provides a comprehensive risk assessment of the product.
Results available
The poultry inspection system trial aimed to explore a modernised official control system which introduced a focused approach to official control verification activity and root cause analysis of poultry processing to address food borne pathogens. Research was commissioned to assess if enhanced verification contributes to a reduction in levels of contamination and unseen microbiological hazards.
Results available
We wished to examine if and how the ‘spotter initiative’ could assist official post-mortem inspection. This approach involves plant-staff flagging any abnormalities they identify during animal processing which may lead to a greater sense of ‘ownership’ of food safety amongst plant-staff.
Results available
This study was designed to provide a risk assessment of whether sheep, experimentally infected with atypical scrapie, harbour infectivity in tissues relevant to food safety. Also information was sought on the pathogenesis and any clinically important differences from classical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.
Results available
This research project aimed to provide data on the infectivity of atypical scrapie following oral dosing and informed part of the risk assessment of what, if any, human risk there might be from atypical scrapie.
Results available
The aim of this study was to apply molecular diagnostic techniques to samples and isolates gathered during a previous field study (project FS145003) to validate the culture results and obtain additional information about the pathogenic potential for humans of the isolates.
Results available
This review examined the value and use of food chain information (FCI) and Collection and Communication of Inspection Results (CCIR) forms. This was done in order to identify and implement possible changes, resulting in an improved system of recording information for surveillance purposes and official meat controls.
Results available
Mae’r astudiaeth ddesg hon wedi nodi’r opsiynau ar gyfer cynhyrchu cig defaid â’r croen ynghlwm mewn modd diogel a hylan, gan amlinellu nifer o argymhellion ar feysydd sydd angen ymchwilio iddynt ymhellach.
Results available
The aim of this study was to investigate how the balance has changed between routine sampling and surveillance conducted by UK Public Health Authorities (PHAs) and Local Authorities (LAs), to evaluate whether there is an increased possibility for incidents or emerging risks to go undetected at UK borders due to a decline in surveillance sampling.
Results available
This review was carried out in 2006 and critically examines the available scientific evidence that would support the (then new) hygiene legislation regarding the regulatory limit on the age restriction of meat at mincing.
Results available
This project aimed to quantify the risk of transmission of novel TSEs to humans.
Results available
The development of TSE diagnostic tests to date has focused on the detection of PrPSc as the only established marker of infection. While this single marker approach has been adequate for surveillance testing purposes, PrPSc may not deliver the specificity and sensitivity required for a blood based pre-clinical assay.
Results available
The combined application of antibody-based and Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCA) techniques as well as bioassay to edible tissues provided key information on their infectivity in TSE infected sheep. It also gave information on how well the biochemical assays performed in comparison to the longer and more costly bioassays.
Results available
Our Strategic Plan for 2005–2010 committed the Agency to promote and aid the development of a sensitive, rapid live test for TSEs by 2010. This study carried out a cost-benefit analysis of the implementation of such tests.
Results available
This research project describes the processes used in the UK for the production of poultry and pork Type 1 and Type 2 mechanically separated meat (MSM) products and meat preparations.
Results available
This research project provided information on the PrPd content of scrapie-infected tissues and how this correlates with infectivity.
Results available